Kinney Shores

Team members:  Nancy Smith,
Maureen Sullivan, Mark Love


Location

Geological History

Level of Development

Additional Facts

Profile Data

Pictures

References


 
 

Location

Kinney Shores is a north-south trending barrier spit that terminates in Goosefare Brook.  Ferry Beach and the heavily eroding Camp Ellis make up the remaining extent of the barrier to the south.  Goosefare Brook has an extensive tidal marsh that backs the region.
 
 






Geological History

Relict spits are found in the Goosefare Brook marsh (Kelley et al., 1989, Farrell, 1972), representing sequential shoreline positions and a seaward progradation of the shoreline.  Progradation requires input of sediment during the late Holocene.  Aerial photos from 1970 show that the channel was once located further south (Farrell, 1972). The dynamic Goosefare Inlet is highly unstable and humans have greatly altered the area in recent years.  It is the dumping spot for Old Orchardís treated sewage, which makes the water quality low. In addition, the inlet was stabilized on its north end by a bulkhead when a railroad trestle was built for easy access to the other side of the brook (Kelley et al., 1989).
 
 

Development Status

Kinney Shores is heavily developed and the natural state of the area has been damaged as a result of seawalls and houses.  Residential development exists along the frontal dunes of the beach, eliminating the natural sand migration of the beach-dune system (Kelley, et al., 1989).  The 1978 storm caused extensive damage to the area, despite the seawalls intended to protect property.  The northern end, near Goosefare Brook, is the only area remaining undeveloped.
 
 

Additional Facts

Goosefare Brook was given its name during colonial times when migratory birds used the marsh as a refuge (Kelley et al., 1989).  A substantial barrier spit formed several thousand years ago, to the west side of Route 9.  It is now covered with dunes and a Pitch Pine forest.
 
 
 

Topographic Profiles
 
 

Profile 1
Monthly Data

Greatest Change

Profile 2
Monthly Data

Greatest Change


 
 
 

Monthly Data
 
 


 
 
 
 

Greatest Change


 
 



 
 
 
 
 

Monthly Data













 
 
 









Pictures
 
 

 
 
 

References

Dickson, S.M., in press, Beach and Dune Geology, Kinney Shores, Goosefare Brook, Saco, Maine, Maine Geological Survey Open-File Report (Photo 10-20)

Farrell, Stewart C., 1972, Present Coastal Processes, Recorded Changes, and the Post-Pleistocene Geologic Record of Saco Bay, Maine [Unpublished Ph.D. thesis]: University of Massachusetts, 296 p.

Kelley, J.T., Kelley, A.R. and Pilkey, O.H., sr., 1989, Living With the Coast of Maine, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, 174 p.

Kelley, J.T., Shipp, R.C., and Belknap, D.F., 1989, Geomorphology and Late Quaternary Evolution of the Saco Bay Region, Maine Geological Survey:  Studies in Maine Geology, vol. 5, p. 47-65.

VanHeteren, S., FitzGerald, D.M., Barber, D.C., Kelley, J.T., and Belknap, D.F., 1996, Volumetric Analysis of a New England Barrier System Using Ground-Penetrating-Radar and Coring Techniques, Journal of Geology, vol. 104, p. 471-483.