Long Sands Beach

Team members:  Lauren Wolf, Tracey Golledge
York Girl Scouts:  Mary Val, Jamie, Nicole, Elizabeth


Location

Geological History

Level of Development

Additional Facts

Profile Data

Pictures

References


 
 

Location

Long Beach, or Long Sands Beach, is approximately 10 miles north of the New Hampshire border and is one of the most southern beaches in Maine.  It is a 2180 m fringing beach (Nelson and Fink, 1980) with a straight shoreline generally oriented northeast-southwest.  Cape Neddick bounds the beach to the north, while Cow Beach Point creates the southern border.  York Harbor, also located to the south of Long Sands, serves as an important shipping port for the region.
 
 






Geological History

Because of the level of development in this area, there are few natural components of a beach remaining (Kelley et al., 1989).  The lack of sand dunes makes the seawall the only protection for property during storms.  After the February 1978 storm surge, a long-time resident and town official reported that large diameter culverts that drain onto the “low-tide terrace” of the beach were completely covered by sand.  This suggests the beach receives constructional refracted swells during certain stages of northeast storms (Nelson, 1979).
 
 

Development Status

Long Sands Beach is highly developed with a seawall protecting the roads and property along the entire length of the beach.  There has been a road running along the high water line since as early as 1854 (Nelson, 1979).  The beach is located along Coastal Route 1A and is one of the state’s major tourist attractions during the summer because of its prime location.
 
 

Additional Facts

At the southern end of Long Sands Beach, a mobile home park sits on top of a stabilized bluff of glacial gravel.  This eliminates a source of sand to the beach (Kelley et al., 1989).
 
 

Topographic Profiles
 
 
Profile 1
Monthly Data

Greatest Change

Profile 2
Monthly Data

Greatest Change

 

 

Monthly Data


 
 
 
 
 
 

Greatest Change


 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 

Monthly Data


 
 
 
 
 

Greatest Change


 
 
 









Pictures
 
 

 

References

Dickson, S.M., in press, Beach and Dune Geology, Long Beach, Railraod Ave Exit, York, Maine, Maine Geological Survey Open-File Report (Photo 1-8).

Kelley, J.T., Kelley, A.R. and Pilkey, O.H., sr., 1989, Living With the Coast of Maine, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, 174 p.

Nelson, B.W., 1979, Shoreline Changes and Physiography of Maine’s Sandy Coastal Beaches [Unpublished M.S. thesis]: University of Maine, 303 p.

Nelson, B.W. and Fink, L.K., Jr., 1980, Geological and Botanical Features of Sand Beach Systems in Maine: Maine Critical Areas Program, Maine State Planning Office Planning Report No. 54, 269 p.